Tag Archives: In The News

PLANNING ALERT: TChances building faces redevelopment

Haringey Council planners are considering an application on the former British Legion building in 399 Tottenham High Road. The building, currently operating as TChances, risks being refurbished and extended to provide 24 flats.

For more information, click on this page on the council’s planning portal, and post your opinions.

The closing date is 29th June 2018.

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Local elections: why they matter

May 3rd is local elections day in Haringey!

That is the day that we- the local electorate- get to decide who we want to represent us for the next four years. It is very important because our borough will receive less central government grant over this period, so it means that the council will have to be very careful over how they spend our money.

Because of the negative reputation of both the council and the borough, it has been the perceived wisdom of most local people to feel that nothing will ever change, and don’t bother to take the few minutes walk to the polling station to vote. After all, every time the borough is mentioned in the media, the news is often bad.

However, if you are angry at what is happening, this is only one way to do something about it. If you care and want decent services for our young people, well maintained community and leisure facilities, better support for our elderly, housebound and the poorest, the welcoming of refugees, better managed social homes, our communities less at risk of violent crime, investment in our main town centres and the overall repair of our public realm and more, then, first of all, if you have your vote, go to your local polling station and cast your three votes to those who you think represents your views. After that, even if you didn’t vote for the successful candidates, get involved in your local community. If there is a residents’ association, protest group or action group in your area, get in touch.

Remember, local democracy isn’t just about elections… There’s a lot more to it than that.

Local elections 2018: the full candidate list

On Thursday May 3rd, the voters of Haringey will go to the polls in the local elections.The borough’s 57 seats covering 19 wards (three in each of them) are up for grabs.

Here is the full list of the candidates wanting your vote. As usual, the four main political parties (Labour, Lib Dems, Conservatives and Greens) dominate, but there are alternatives in some wards (Duma Polska=Polish Pride In Harringay and Tottenham Hale, English Democrats in Northumberland Park, Trade Unionists and Socialists Against Cuts in Seven Sisters, Christian Peoples’ Alliance in Stroud Green, Federalist Party in Tottenham Green, Democrats and Veterans Party in White Hart Lane and Woodside). However, only two independents (one in St Ann’s, the other in West Green) will be standing this time.

North Middlesex Hospital survey- your chance to comment

From Healthwatch Haringey, our local NHS watchdog:

Is North Middlesex hospital treating everyone fairly?

The North Mid hospital have asked Healthwatch Haringey to find out how well they are meeting their equalities duties. We would like to hear from people of all different ethnic backgrounds, ages, sexes, sexualities, religions, marital statuses and disabilities about how easy they find it to access the hospital buildings and services at North Mid. The North Mid hospital serves a diverse population of patients and visitors and it is important that everyone feels equally able to use the hospital when they need it.

Take this online survey to share your views. The closing date is 28th February 2018

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/northmidequalities

Council “on collision course” with Labour leaders

The BBC reported that there could be signs that Labour councillors in Haringey could be set on a collision course with the party’s main decision body, the National Executive Committee, over the on-going struggles with the borough’s regeneration programme.

Earlier this week, the NEC were finally forced to intervene in the local party’s affairs by urging Haringey Council to delay its controversial HDV plans ahead of the local borough elections in May. The infighting within the party between supporters of leader Claire Kober and the candidates backed by Momentum, has seen several sitting councillors either deselected or withdrawing, leading to personal bitterness on all sides.

This sorry affair will only re-enforce the negative reputation of both the council and the borough as a whole. All this is going on while finite funding for key services are repeatedly cut, allegations have been made about regeneration funds being poorly spent, and that the only strategy put in place is by delievering what is left through on-going crisis management. Some councillors, and indeed officers, seem intent on waiting for some magic wand to save the borough from its own self-inflicted problems.

For local people, constantly embarrassed by what is going on, the only way to end this farce is to first continue to protest against the hated HDV, then in May aim to vote for an administration who will pledge to take action in tackling the borough’s deep-rooted divisions.

Monument Way planning update

A planning application has been submitted over the proposed construction of three blocks of 54+ flats ranging from 4 to 5 storeys in height on green land between Fairbanks Road and Monument Way (information previously posted on this blog here).

Local residents in Fairbanks Road, the Chesnut estate, and surrounding streets should have received a letter about the application.

Log onto the planning page here (Reference no. HGY/2018/0050) and make a comment about the application. The closing date is 6th February 2018.

Haringey Labour infighting goes national

Oh dear. Infighting within the Haringey Labour party has become national news. The main reason for this is the on-going criticism of the controversial development and regeneration council policies.

Supporters of both the council group led by Claire Kober and their critics who oppose them are going through selection contests to see who will represent the party in next May’s local elections. Some of the party’s high profile big hitters who have backed these policies have been deselected, and others who fear they could be next had decided that they would stand down.

Tonight’s/last night’s London Evening Standard newspaper published an article on this issue. Infighting within sections of Labour is nothing new, as the party has been repeatedly prone to entryism throughout its history.

If many commentators think this will lead to the slow meltdown of Labour both locally and nationally, they will be very disappointed. The only thing that is sustaining them is the fact that the vast majority of Tottenham residents either do not, will not or cannot vote, as a result, they stay in power.

While so much attention has been paid by journalists to the selection process, very little has been written about the way Labour has mis-managed the borough for over 40 years. There is a real and worrying prospect next May that another re-elected Labour administration will be led by either a Kober-like council privatising almost everything, or a Momentum-like organisation, spending a lot of energy campaigning against the government rather than actually delivering services.

But there is a choice. It is not inevitable. This represents a big opportunity for the main opposition parties, like the Lib Dems, Conservatives and Greens, to repeatedly attack Labour’s decades of inaction, and to put forward positive and realistic solutions for the borough.

A damning critique of how Labour run Haringey- by a Labour councillor

This has been in the news in the last few days. A Labour councillor who is standing down from Haringey Council ahead of next year’s borough local elections has criticised the way that the borough has been managed in a strongly-worded letter sent to leader Cllr Claire Kober obtained by the StopHDV website.

In the letter, Cllr Stuart McNamara has attacked the council’s repeated poor governance, bad management and decision making which has led to repeated cuts in vital local services. He has also been highly critical of the borough’s regeneration policies and the constant waste of scarce resources. He also feels that the council also does its business in secret by handing over portfolios to a handful of officers and the executive at the expense of backbench and opposition councillors and the wider public.

Cllr McNamara is certainly right about the way Cllr Kober has led the council. After the Baby P scandal back in 2008 which led to the resignation of the late George Meehan, Kober’s elected to head the Labour group at the time was seen as a new broom. However, she has adopted the policies of her predecessor. She refused to start addressing the issues which led to the riots in 2011, problems that she helped continue have been deeply felt here in Tottenham for a very long time.

It’s hard not to disagree with Cllr McNamara on this. However, he needs to be questioned over the fact that if he, the backbench Labour councillors and party members put pressure to Kober and her friends’ control of the council’s powers, we wouldn’t be having to fight to stop the threat of Ward’s Corner be demolished. We wouldn’t also have had to do shady deals with big business in order to get anything done. They could have used their collective influence to stop all this nonsense, but chose not to.

The entire Labour party in Haringey are collectively to blame for this state of affairs. That includes Cllr McNamara.

Planning alert: The Goods Yard, White Hart Lane: exhibition

Local residents are invited to a public exhibition on yet another new development in Tottenham.

This concerns the currently empty Goods Yard site, at 44-52 White Hart Lane, in a development supported by Tottenham Hotspur FC.

The proposals, if approved, there would be:

  • Around 330 new homes
  • Providing new employment, office and retail units
  • A new ‘public square’
  • Restoration of a listed building to bring it into public use.

The proposed development is part of the planned controversial changes to this part of north Tottenham. Many local people are understandably unhappy about this, and how it has come about. More on this, and the overview of the problems by Defend Council Housing here.

The exhibition will be held over three days, taking place at:

Haringey Irish Cultural and Community Centre, Pretoria Road, N17 8DX (Either the nearest bus- W3 stops on White Hart Lane itself, or take London Overground train to White Hart Lane station, plus a short walk) ,on

  • Friday (Tomorrow) 3rd November 4pm-8pm
  • Saturday 4th November 10am-2pm
  • Monday 6th November 4pm-8pm

For more information, contact by email – goodsyard(at)londoncommunications.co.uk, or call 0800 307 7014.

Parliamentary boundary review changes- your comment is invited

The Boundary Commission for England published its revised proposals for the Tottenham parliamentary constituency earlier today.

The revised proposals (if you look on the map on this page and type either your postcode or zoom in) is mainly consisting of the removal of the Stroud Green ward from the initial proposals. However, the Woodside ward which is currently in the neighbouring Hornsey and Wood Green constituency, was added. The rest of the constituency remains unchanged.

Earlier fears that the constituency would be broken up were unfounded. In the report, local MP David Lammy commented:

“With complex problems, including the highest level of temporary accomodation in London, a transient population, failed estates, some of the highest unemployment levels in London, a high level of crime, the lack of a town centre focus, and a breakdown in the relationships between the community and the police… it is vitally important that the integrity of Tottenham as a constituency is maintained.”

If you have a view on the revised boundaries, then click on this page, and make a comment. The consulation will end on 11th December 2017. For more information about the boundary review, see this video.

The changes to the new boundaries, if approved, will take into effect at the next general election.